68. Celebration (2009)
Hey, it’s a celebration. And just to do that traditional non-literal Madonna video thing, this one is rather minimal.
Madonna - clad in a black studded dress (or are they silver polka dots?) and some fierce knee-high boots - sports a pair of aviator sunglasses that manage to give her a slightly masculine feel, despite the dress’ elegant bow.
She dances, as do two male dancers, who get a black background to contrast with her white. Madonna does some of her trademark sensual writhing, though this time it’s all in an upright position, but with a wall to writhe against. There’s also a bit of crotch-grabbing thrown in for good measure - possibly a tribute to the recently deceased Michael Jackson.
Madonna’s hot boyfriend Jesus plays a DJ. “I guess I didn’t recognise you with your clothes on,” she laughs, unshirting him to jog her memory.
Near the end, we’re introduced to a larger group of dancers, celebrating with some dope dance moves. One of these is Madonna’s daughter Lourdes, who does a mean-as backwards roll, a definite one-up on her mom’s sensual writhing. She’ll go far, that girl.
And so this brings me up to date - the 68th of the 68 music videos Madonna has released. It’s nice to end on this celebratory note, though it is a little sad that Madonna hasn’t made any videos yet this decade.
The webs tell me she’s currently auteuring a film about Wallis Simpson, which actually sounds like it might not be too bad. If the spirit and energy of Madonna’s 26 years of music videos can come through in that film, then it will be a good thing indeed.

68. Celebration (2009)

Hey, it’s a celebration. And just to do that traditional non-literal Madonna video thing, this one is rather minimal.

Madonna - clad in a black studded dress (or are they silver polka dots?) and some fierce knee-high boots - sports a pair of aviator sunglasses that manage to give her a slightly masculine feel, despite the dress’ elegant bow.

She dances, as do two male dancers, who get a black background to contrast with her white. Madonna does some of her trademark sensual writhing, though this time it’s all in an upright position, but with a wall to writhe against. There’s also a bit of crotch-grabbing thrown in for good measure - possibly a tribute to the recently deceased Michael Jackson.

Madonna’s hot boyfriend Jesus plays a DJ. “I guess I didn’t recognise you with your clothes on,” she laughs, unshirting him to jog her memory.

Near the end, we’re introduced to a larger group of dancers, celebrating with some dope dance moves. One of these is Madonna’s daughter Lourdes, who does a mean-as backwards roll, a definite one-up on her mom’s sensual writhing. She’ll go far, that girl.

And so this brings me up to date - the 68th of the 68 music videos Madonna has released. It’s nice to end on this celebratory note, though it is a little sad that Madonna hasn’t made any videos yet this decade.

The webs tell me she’s currently auteuring a film about Wallis Simpson, which actually sounds like it might not be too bad. If the spirit and energy of Madonna’s 26 years of music videos can come through in that film, then it will be a good thing indeed.

madonna

67. Miles Away (2008)
What’s new, Buenos Aires? This video is made up of concert and road footage of Madonna’s Sticky and Sweet tour performance in Buenos Aires.
When a pop or rock musician spends enough time touring, it starts to get to them and eventually becomes one of two song types. It’s either the rugged road warrior, like Metallica’s Wherever I May Roam (“and the road becomes my bride”) or Bon Jovi’s Wanted Dead or Alive, in which the tour-weary narrator pretends he’s a cowboy get through the tedium of endless travel. Or there’s the “this distance is tearing us apart!” song, like Shihad’s Home Again, which also mentions the tyranny of being “miles away” from the one you love.
This is the dilemma Madonna faces. There she is, being a part of B.A. Buenos Aires, Big Apple, and yet her sweetie is back in England making shithouse gangster films without her.
Even though, on first appearance, the video seems to be a bog standard concert-based experience, there is a hit of the tension. Madonna’s performance looks a little stiff, a little rote (even though the soundtrack in this instance is the edited-in album version). And we catch glimpses of her in the daily bustle of a touring musician - from car to plane to arena. Never stopping.
There’s a clip of the full live performance too, which has the same stiffness to it in places, but there are also moments where Madonna seems to be genuinely loving the experience of performing in front of the giant arena full of her descamisados. Could it be that Madonna loves touring too much, and the song is not so much about the stress of distance on a relationship, but is lamenting that he doesn’t understand her preference to be away?

67. Miles Away (2008)

What’s new, Buenos Aires? This video is made up of concert and road footage of Madonna’s Sticky and Sweet tour performance in Buenos Aires.

When a pop or rock musician spends enough time touring, it starts to get to them and eventually becomes one of two song types. It’s either the rugged road warrior, like Metallica’s Wherever I May Roam (“and the road becomes my bride”) or Bon Jovi’s Wanted Dead or Alive, in which the tour-weary narrator pretends he’s a cowboy get through the tedium of endless travel. Or there’s the “this distance is tearing us apart!” song, like Shihad’s Home Again, which also mentions the tyranny of being “miles away” from the one you love.

This is the dilemma Madonna faces. There she is, being a part of B.A. Buenos Aires, Big Apple, and yet her sweetie is back in England making shithouse gangster films without her.

Even though, on first appearance, the video seems to be a bog standard concert-based experience, there is a hit of the tension. Madonna’s performance looks a little stiff, a little rote (even though the soundtrack in this instance is the edited-in album version). And we catch glimpses of her in the daily bustle of a touring musician - from car to plane to arena. Never stopping.

There’s a clip of the full live performance too, which has the same stiffness to it in places, but there are also moments where Madonna seems to be genuinely loving the experience of performing in front of the giant arena full of her descamisados. Could it be that Madonna loves touring too much, and the song is not so much about the stress of distance on a relationship, but is lamenting that he doesn’t understand her preference to be away?

madonna

66. Give It 2 Me (2008)
Ok, let’s call in another hot, talented young man for collaborative duties. This time it’s Mr Pharrell Williams, co-writer and backing vocalist.
Give It 2 Me is an inoffensive dance tune. And I say this because I like it when Madonna’s songs have a little offensiveness to them, a slight edge. Pharrell was a bit of a musical be-cooler 4 hire, and as the 2000s progressed, it started to feel like he was using up all his good ideas.
The video starts with Madonna staring deep into her own eyes, as she sings the song in front of a dance studio mirror. It makes me wonder if she practised her sexy face while she was a dance student back in the olden days.
Careful lighting and filters allow Madonna to blend back a few decades, not looking anywhere near what one would expect a 50-year-old woman to look like. I’m pretty sure she and Pharrell were never in the same room at the same time due to all his appearances being either solo or in a cut ‘n’ paste montage.
There’s just something slightly missing here. After the previous run of five splendid dance tracks, this one feels like a bit of a let down, rather by-the-numbers.
And despite Madonna’s late ’70s revival styles never feeling like comedy retro and fitting right in with the 2000s, it’s all starting to get a bit tired here. It’s time for another reinvention, please.

66. Give It 2 Me (2008)

Ok, let’s call in another hot, talented young man for collaborative duties. This time it’s Mr Pharrell Williams, co-writer and backing vocalist.

Give It 2 Me is an inoffensive dance tune. And I say this because I like it when Madonna’s songs have a little offensiveness to them, a slight edge. Pharrell was a bit of a musical be-cooler 4 hire, and as the 2000s progressed, it started to feel like he was using up all his good ideas.

The video starts with Madonna staring deep into her own eyes, as she sings the song in front of a dance studio mirror. It makes me wonder if she practised her sexy face while she was a dance student back in the olden days.

Careful lighting and filters allow Madonna to blend back a few decades, not looking anywhere near what one would expect a 50-year-old woman to look like. I’m pretty sure she and Pharrell were never in the same room at the same time due to all his appearances being either solo or in a cut ‘n’ paste montage.

There’s just something slightly missing here. After the previous run of five splendid dance tracks, this one feels like a bit of a let down, rather by-the-numbers.

And despite Madonna’s late ’70s revival styles never feeling like comedy retro and fitting right in with the 2000s, it’s all starting to get a bit tired here. It’s time for another reinvention, please.

madonna

65. 4 Minutes (Featuring Justin Timberlake) (2008)
The song with Britney is piffled compared to this. 4 Minutes, co-written with Madonna and Mr JT, is a stonking powerhouse track. The lyrics cleverly rest on a double meaning of being a call to arms to save the world (make poverty history, and all that) or a “Hey, the world is ending - let’s have sex” moment.
Madonna and Justin appear in the videos as absolute equals. She’s not his chick and he’s not her beefcake. If she takes off his shirt, he takes off her corset. Tit for mantit.
The pair are being pursued by a giant black screen that absorbs everything in its path. We’re treated to the sight of a young couple pashing the the screen hits them, making visible the inner workings of their mouth love, tongues and all.
A burst of hot Madonna-on-Justin action is hinted at as he pulls her into a car, but obviously there’s no time for such carry on - they’ve only four minutes to, etc.
Interestingly, they don’t have many shots together, though will be in the same room at the same time. I think this may be due to Madonna having special lovely-face natural glow lighting that would look weird shining on beardy Timberlake’s face.
But despite the seemingly egalitarian relationship between Justin and Madge, it seems the rules still apply - if you think you can go one-on-one with Madonna and win, you’d better think again. Since recording this song, Justin Timberlake has not released any more albums, focusing instead on his acting career.

65. 4 Minutes (Featuring Justin Timberlake) (2008)

The song with Britney is piffled compared to this. 4 Minutes, co-written with Madonna and Mr JT, is a stonking powerhouse track. The lyrics cleverly rest on a double meaning of being a call to arms to save the world (make poverty history, and all that) or a “Hey, the world is ending - let’s have sex” moment.

Madonna and Justin appear in the videos as absolute equals. She’s not his chick and he’s not her beefcake. If she takes off his shirt, he takes off her corset. Tit for mantit.

The pair are being pursued by a giant black screen that absorbs everything in its path. We’re treated to the sight of a young couple pashing the the screen hits them, making visible the inner workings of their mouth love, tongues and all.

A burst of hot Madonna-on-Justin action is hinted at as he pulls her into a car, but obviously there’s no time for such carry on - they’ve only four minutes to, etc.

Interestingly, they don’t have many shots together, though will be in the same room at the same time. I think this may be due to Madonna having special lovely-face natural glow lighting that would look weird shining on beardy Timberlake’s face.

But despite the seemingly egalitarian relationship between Justin and Madge, it seems the rules still apply - if you think you can go one-on-one with Madonna and win, you’d better think again. Since recording this song, Justin Timberlake has not released any more albums, focusing instead on his acting career.

madonna

64. Jump (2006)
Madonna’s wearing a platinum blonde wig, which manages to look both like her actual hair and one of those $5 party wigs that turn into dreadlocks between the Value Dollar Bargain store and your place.
The blonde wig is part of a black urban explorer costume that Madonna wears as she dances around a sort of urban jungle gym - a set of bars on which she jumps, flips and spins, and behind that is a series of lightboxes emulating a Japanese city scene.
All this is cut with scenes of fit dudes doing parkour around a Japanese city, and there’s a rough association with the parkour moves and the lyrics.
The song is a massive assertion of independence.
I’m going down my own road and I can make it alone. I’ll work and I’ll fight till I find a place of my own.
Wait, now? It’s almost 25 years into Madonna’s career and now comes the statement of independence?
But Madonna isn’t quite alone in this song.
We learned our lesson from the start, my sisters and me. The only thing you can depend on is your family.
There we go - Madonna still has a posse. She knows that she needs people who’ll unconditionally back her up. Her brother doesn’t get a mention, but he did go on to write a biography dishing the dirt on his famous sis, so perhaps that was a good call.
It seems that age has not settled Madonna. She’s still fighting to be her own person, pulling away from all the identities thrown at her. If she wants to drop her wife/mother duties and put on a blonde wig and hang out in a fantasy Tokyo gymnasium, then that’s what she’ll do.

64. Jump (2006)

Madonna’s wearing a platinum blonde wig, which manages to look both like her actual hair and one of those $5 party wigs that turn into dreadlocks between the Value Dollar Bargain store and your place.

The blonde wig is part of a black urban explorer costume that Madonna wears as she dances around a sort of urban jungle gym - a set of bars on which she jumps, flips and spins, and behind that is a series of lightboxes emulating a Japanese city scene.

All this is cut with scenes of fit dudes doing parkour around a Japanese city, and there’s a rough association with the parkour moves and the lyrics.

The song is a massive assertion of independence.

I’m going down my own road and I can make it alone.
I’ll work and I’ll fight till I find a place of my own.

Wait, now? It’s almost 25 years into Madonna’s career and now comes the statement of independence?

But Madonna isn’t quite alone in this song.

We learned our lesson from the start, my sisters and me.
The only thing you can depend on is your family.

There we go - Madonna still has a posse. She knows that she needs people who’ll unconditionally back her up. Her brother doesn’t get a mention, but he did go on to write a biography dishing the dirt on his famous sis, so perhaps that was a good call.

It seems that age has not settled Madonna. She’s still fighting to be her own person, pulling away from all the identities thrown at her. If she wants to drop her wife/mother duties and put on a blonde wig and hang out in a fantasy Tokyo gymnasium, then that’s what she’ll do.

madonna

63. Get Together (2006)
I give thanks and praise for the production and songwriting skills of Stuart Price and his work on Confessions on a Dancefloor and the singles released from it. I give thanks and praise for the lightness and joy he brings to this album, a welcome relief from the heavy-handedness that has dogged many of Madonna’s releases from the previous decade, particularly the deceptively named Ray of Light album.
Get Together is another lovely club track. The video is animated, but no in the cutesy style previous Madonna animations have used.
Madonna’s likeness is based on actual live footage of her, and it has a totally different feel to her usual video style. She seems much looser and happier. And even though her hair is still styled in the official Confessions-era ’70s disco chick style, there’s a slightly uncontrolled feeling to her dancing, like she’s actually just having a good night out at a disco, rather than being a pop star making a music video.
Surrounding Madonna are futuristic cityscapes, with coloured lights bending around this world. It makes me think that this is the sort of video that Madonna would have preferred to have made for the singles off her first album, if only money (and indeed technology) had reached that far.

63. Get Together (2006)

I give thanks and praise for the production and songwriting skills of Stuart Price and his work on Confessions on a Dancefloor and the singles released from it. I give thanks and praise for the lightness and joy he brings to this album, a welcome relief from the heavy-handedness that has dogged many of Madonna’s releases from the previous decade, particularly the deceptively named Ray of Light album.

Get Together is another lovely club track. The video is animated, but no in the cutesy style previous Madonna animations have used.

Madonna’s likeness is based on actual live footage of her, and it has a totally different feel to her usual video style. She seems much looser and happier. And even though her hair is still styled in the official Confessions-era ’70s disco chick style, there’s a slightly uncontrolled feeling to her dancing, like she’s actually just having a good night out at a disco, rather than being a pop star making a music video.

Surrounding Madonna are futuristic cityscapes, with coloured lights bending around this world. It makes me think that this is the sort of video that Madonna would have preferred to have made for the singles off her first album, if only money (and indeed technology) had reached that far.

madonna

62. Sorry (2006)
The story picks up where Hung Up left off. With DDR conquered, Madonna and her homegirls leave the nightclub and jump in a van, much to the annoyance of some dudes they were presumedly hanging out with.
Madonna strips off her Travoltaeseque jeans, to reveal a leotard, which she accessorises with roller skates. Cutaway studio Madonna, meanwhile, is wearing a purple leotard with a matching corset - the Madonna equivalent of control-top briefs.
The girls drive around town, randomly abducting men from the street. This is either to teach them a lesson about being respectful to the womens or just cos, hey, it’s a party van!
Actually, how hard would it be to walk in the back of a moving van wearing rollerskates? It would be quite hard, yeah? I don’t even think an experienced roller derby girl could manage that, yet Madonna does.
Soon the van is full of male stereotypes - a streetwise dude, a nerd, a fatman, a muscle man, a magician, and a cute little boy. Madonna taunts and teases them. There’s only way all this smouldering sexual tension can be resolved - a caged dance-off show-down (sometimes DDR isn’t enough).
Madonna and her homegirls go up against the dudes from the van. There are dance moves a-plenty, and predictably Madonna pulls out her signature move - sensually writhing on the floor with a few yoga moves thrown in. I mean, if you can sensually writhe and then put both legs behind your head, surely that’s enough to win the bout.
With Madonna the champ, it’s then off for some good times at the local roller disco (which surely is where they were originally heading, before being sidetracked by the dance-off). It’s all very Saturday Night Xanadu, with giant mirror balls, and an appearance by the magical ghettoblaster from Hung Up. Dispute resolved, joy reinstated, Madonna and her posse return to the van and head off into the night.
Another fine night in Madonnaland.

62. Sorry (2006)

The story picks up where Hung Up left off. With DDR conquered, Madonna and her homegirls leave the nightclub and jump in a van, much to the annoyance of some dudes they were presumedly hanging out with.

Madonna strips off her Travoltaeseque jeans, to reveal a leotard, which she accessorises with roller skates. Cutaway studio Madonna, meanwhile, is wearing a purple leotard with a matching corset - the Madonna equivalent of control-top briefs.

The girls drive around town, randomly abducting men from the street. This is either to teach them a lesson about being respectful to the womens or just cos, hey, it’s a party van!

Actually, how hard would it be to walk in the back of a moving van wearing rollerskates? It would be quite hard, yeah? I don’t even think an experienced roller derby girl could manage that, yet Madonna does.

Soon the van is full of male stereotypes - a streetwise dude, a nerd, a fatman, a muscle man, a magician, and a cute little boy. Madonna taunts and teases them. There’s only way all this smouldering sexual tension can be resolved - a caged dance-off show-down (sometimes DDR isn’t enough).

Madonna and her homegirls go up against the dudes from the van. There are dance moves a-plenty, and predictably Madonna pulls out her signature move - sensually writhing on the floor with a few yoga moves thrown in. I mean, if you can sensually writhe and then put both legs behind your head, surely that’s enough to win the bout.

With Madonna the champ, it’s then off for some good times at the local roller disco (which surely is where they were originally heading, before being sidetracked by the dance-off). It’s all very Saturday Night Xanadu, with giant mirror balls, and an appearance by the magical ghettoblaster from Hung Up. Dispute resolved, joy reinstated, Madonna and her posse return to the van and head off into the night.

Another fine night in Madonnaland.

madonna

61. Hung Up (2005)
It’s been ages since Madonna’s done a proper dance video. Can the married mother of two still bring it on the floor? Why, yes!
Hung Up is the song where Madonna gets her groove back, neatly paralleling the joy of dance with the joy of having a big ol’ crush in someone.
The video starts with Madonna walking into a dance studio, wearing a blue tracksuit. Madonna used to wear tracksuits all the time. Apparently it was done to deliberately devalue her image - if all the paparazzi get are photos of Madonna in tracksuits every day, eventually they’ll start to drop off and go pursue stars with a more varied wardrobe.
But in this video the tracksuit comes off, revealing a pink leotard, pink dancer’s cardigan, a purple sequinned belt pair with fleshtone knee-long leggings. And Madonna has giant disco-era hair, which goes perfectly with the leotard action.
The song starts playing on her massive ghettoblaster, and as soon as the Abba sample starts working its way in, the song extends from the Madonna’s Golden Legz Dance Academy out into the wider world.
While Madonna moves with the spirit in the studio, outside the people on the street, in diners, taxicabs, on subway cars all start moving with the groove. There’s breakin’, poppin’ and even a bit of parkour.
And - just to show how ace Madonna is - there’s even a hint of Evita in the lyrics: Don’t cry for me ‘cause I’ll find my way. And I’m much happier to have that sort of Evita influence than when Madonna’s vowels went all weird circa Ray of Light.
Madonna throws in the towel (literally!) and leaves the dance studio, gearing up in jeans, a t-shirt and a fierce leather jacket to hit the town. She’s in the club and there’s some slow-motion mackin’ with a bunch of hotties at the nightclub. Madonna, married mother of two can still bring it. She is so cool. I want to be that when I am in a nightclub, etc.
Then things really go off the hook - Madonna jumps upon a Dance Dance Revolution machine (cleverly renamed Dance Star Fusion) and starts busting a move. But those direction arrows don’t tell her what to do. She’s jumping all over that thing, using the safety rails for bonus mini parkour styles. EXPERT LEVEL SCORE!!!
It’s good to have Madonna the dancer back.

61. Hung Up (2005)

It’s been ages since Madonna’s done a proper dance video. Can the married mother of two still bring it on the floor? Why, yes!

Hung Up is the song where Madonna gets her groove back, neatly paralleling the joy of dance with the joy of having a big ol’ crush in someone.

The video starts with Madonna walking into a dance studio, wearing a blue tracksuit. Madonna used to wear tracksuits all the time. Apparently it was done to deliberately devalue her image - if all the paparazzi get are photos of Madonna in tracksuits every day, eventually they’ll start to drop off and go pursue stars with a more varied wardrobe.

But in this video the tracksuit comes off, revealing a pink leotard, pink dancer’s cardigan, a purple sequinned belt pair with fleshtone knee-long leggings. And Madonna has giant disco-era hair, which goes perfectly with the leotard action.

The song starts playing on her massive ghettoblaster, and as soon as the Abba sample starts working its way in, the song extends from the Madonna’s Golden Legz Dance Academy out into the wider world.

While Madonna moves with the spirit in the studio, outside the people on the street, in diners, taxicabs, on subway cars all start moving with the groove. There’s breakin’, poppin’ and even a bit of parkour.

And - just to show how ace Madonna is - there’s even a hint of Evita in the lyrics: Don’t cry for me ‘cause I’ll find my way. And I’m much happier to have that sort of Evita influence than when Madonna’s vowels went all weird circa Ray of Light.

Madonna throws in the towel (literally!) and leaves the dance studio, gearing up in jeans, a t-shirt and a fierce leather jacket to hit the town. She’s in the club and there’s some slow-motion mackin’ with a bunch of hotties at the nightclub. Madonna, married mother of two can still bring it. She is so cool. I want to be that when I am in a nightclub, etc.

Then things really go off the hook - Madonna jumps upon a Dance Dance Revolution machine (cleverly renamed Dance Star Fusion) and starts busting a move. But those direction arrows don’t tell her what to do. She’s jumping all over that thing, using the safety rails for bonus mini parkour styles. EXPERT LEVEL SCORE!!!

It’s good to have Madonna the dancer back.

madonna

60. Love Profusion (2003)
This video is another classic example of jigging about in front of a green screen. Madonna starts off in a bad bad city, all a-swirl with leaves and litter, then magically it transforms into an enchanted world that looks like a ’90s-style screen saver.
It’s a world of white sandy beaches, lovely flowers, tropical fish, a pathway of rose petals and fairies. Yay, fairies!
Madonna’s wearing a 1940s-style floral dress, which seems to be her go-to look when she wants to be soft, delicate and feminine. It’s the wardrobe opposite of the corset and manpants look.
The whole video has a slightly sinister feel. It reminds me of the scene from Contact where astronaut Jodie Foster finds herself on a strange beach and sees her father. It’s an uneasy place, and despite the song’s lyrical joy, it doesn’t feel like a safe place to be.
The video ends with the fairies swarming around Madonna before enveloping her entirely. Suddenly they fly away, revealing no Madonna where she once stood. This can only mean one thing - the fairies have eaten Madonna, piranha-style. This is terrible.

60. Love Profusion (2003)

This video is another classic example of jigging about in front of a green screen. Madonna starts off in a bad bad city, all a-swirl with leaves and litter, then magically it transforms into an enchanted world that looks like a ’90s-style screen saver.

It’s a world of white sandy beaches, lovely flowers, tropical fish, a pathway of rose petals and fairies. Yay, fairies!

Madonna’s wearing a 1940s-style floral dress, which seems to be her go-to look when she wants to be soft, delicate and feminine. It’s the wardrobe opposite of the corset and manpants look.

The whole video has a slightly sinister feel. It reminds me of the scene from Contact where astronaut Jodie Foster finds herself on a strange beach and sees her father. It’s an uneasy place, and despite the song’s lyrical joy, it doesn’t feel like a safe place to be.

The video ends with the fairies swarming around Madonna before enveloping her entirely. Suddenly they fly away, revealing no Madonna where she once stood. This can only mean one thing - the fairies have eaten Madonna, piranha-style. This is terrible.

madonna

59. Me Against the Music (with Britney Spears) (2003)
Hey, Britney, you say you wanna lose control.
So, Madonna teams up with the reigning pop idol of the day. Is this a case of Madonna acknowledging the next generation, or an example of keeping your friends close but your enemies closer?
The action takes place at a nightclub. Britney, looking hot and bothered, wanders the club in a state of unease, while in the VIP room Madonna - in full ladypimp get-up - watches Britney on a CCTV. Perhaps Madonna is displeased by Britney’s greasy stringy hair.
But it’s not time for Madge and Bit-Bit to come together yet. They have an informal dance-off either side of a wall, the likes of which have not been seen in a music video since Aerosmith vs Run DMC in the Walk This Way vid. Each do a dance style of their choice - Britney (who has a posse) do formation dancing, while Madonna (who does not need a posse) writhes sensually on the floor, throwing in a few tricky yoga moves for good measure.
Eventually Britney and Madonna end up together in a room, where they continue their dance off around an old rusty bed frame. As Madonna is a skilled practitioner in the art of sensually writhing about inanimate objects, she is the clear winner. Britney’s awkward moves look like the sort of thing you’d see in YouTube videos of teenage boys humping sofas.
Britney appears to have cornered Madonna for a lesbionic pash, only for Madonna to mysteriously fade away into thin air, leaving Britney wondering WTF just happened. Well, maybe it’s Madonna’s way of saying you just haven’t earned it yet, baby.
Madonna sings: Hey, Britney, you say you wanna lose control.
Madonna didn’t get her first number one song until she was 26. By the time Britney was 26, she had a fistful of number ones, but was in the middle of a very public breakdown.

59. Me Against the Music (with Britney Spears) (2003)

Hey, Britney, you say you wanna lose control.

So, Madonna teams up with the reigning pop idol of the day. Is this a case of Madonna acknowledging the next generation, or an example of keeping your friends close but your enemies closer?

The action takes place at a nightclub. Britney, looking hot and bothered, wanders the club in a state of unease, while in the VIP room Madonna - in full ladypimp get-up - watches Britney on a CCTV. Perhaps Madonna is displeased by Britney’s greasy stringy hair.

But it’s not time for Madge and Bit-Bit to come together yet. They have an informal dance-off either side of a wall, the likes of which have not been seen in a music video since Aerosmith vs Run DMC in the Walk This Way vid. Each do a dance style of their choice - Britney (who has a posse) do formation dancing, while Madonna (who does not need a posse) writhes sensually on the floor, throwing in a few tricky yoga moves for good measure.

Eventually Britney and Madonna end up together in a room, where they continue their dance off around an old rusty bed frame. As Madonna is a skilled practitioner in the art of sensually writhing about inanimate objects, she is the clear winner. Britney’s awkward moves look like the sort of thing you’d see in YouTube videos of teenage boys humping sofas.

Britney appears to have cornered Madonna for a lesbionic pash, only for Madonna to mysteriously fade away into thin air, leaving Britney wondering WTF just happened. Well, maybe it’s Madonna’s way of saying you just haven’t earned it yet, baby.

Madonna sings: Hey, Britney, you say you wanna lose control.

Madonna didn’t get her first number one song until she was 26. By the time Britney was 26, she had a fistful of number ones, but was in the middle of a very public breakdown.

madonna